Political Bots

Project on Algorithms, Computational Propaganda, and Digital Politics

506027963_001d37ceb7_o

Three Research Appointments in Computational Social Science

We are looking for three talented researchers to join our team of computational social scientists at Oxford.  Ideally, we’d like to have one person interested in the sociology of algorithmic production, another interested in the policy implications of bots, and another in the computational analysis of political bots and botnets. The full job descriptions are available on…

Continue Reading

erc

Bots, #StrongerIn, and #Brexit: Computational Propaganda during the UK-EU Referendum

Bots are social media accounts that automate interaction with other users, and they are active on the StrongerIn-Brexit conversation happening over Twitter. These automated scripts generate content through these platforms and then interact with people. Political bots are automated accounts that are particularly active on public policy issues, elections, and political crises. In this preliminary…

Continue Reading

A $1 Million Fight Against Hillary Clinton’s Online Trolls

Helped with a story on the Atlantic about Hillary Clinton’s response to online trolling. “A lot of digital campaign strategy is experimental and run for fear of losing,” Phil Howard, a professor at the Oxford Internet Institute said. “No one wants to be the team who lost because they didn’t try a particular strategy, but that…

Continue Reading

twitter

How Twitter Bots Could Sway the Outcome of the Presidential Election

We helped with this story on Killscreen: In the midst of the most unprecedented election season in recent history, questioning the political power of technology is now more important than ever. Over on Wired, Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard investigated how social platform’s could be changing the course of history with propaganda bots. Elsewhere, Twitter…

Continue Reading

Video: Politics, Propaganda, and Bots–The Changing Nature of Cyber Warfare

The News Impact Summit London on the theme, “Trolls, Corruption, Falsehood: Reporting ‘Truth’ in the Digital Age”. The event was held on Thursday 12 May 2016 at the Sheikh Zayed Theatre on the campus of London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE).  

ap_twitterbots_eagle-582x776

Bots Unite to Automate the Presidential Election

This originally appeared as “These are the Droids You’re Looking For:  Bots as a Tool For Journalism” by Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard in the May 2016 issue of Wired Magazine. DONALD TRUMP UNDERSTANDS minority communities. Just ask Pepe Luis Lopez, Francisco Palma, and Alberto Contreras. These guys are among the candidate’s 7 million Twitter…

Continue Reading

WP_20160523_09_29_12_Richa__1464285343_162.216.46.46

The Impact of Social Media on Political Debate (in Dutch)

Our work was featured in the Dutch newspaper de Volkscrant.

506027963_001d37ceb7_o

These are the Droids You’re Looking For: Bots as a Tool For Journalism

This originally appeared as “These are the Droids You’re Looking For:  Bots as a Tool For Journalism” by Samuel Woolley and Phil Howard on the National Endowment for Democracy’s Center for International Media Assistance Blog. In today’s data-saturated world journalists often struggle to report on many, if not most, of the potential stories that come across their…

Continue Reading

IoT100

Presentation at Yale Law School

Project collaborators Phil Howard and Sam Woolley presented a coauthored paper, “Campaign Bots & The Law”, authored by Ryan Calo, Lisa Manheim, Sam Woolley and Phil Howard. It was presented at the Yale Information Society Project’s “Unlocking the Black Box” conference, and we identify the ways in which bots, when used by political campaign managers,…

Continue Reading

wallpaper_retro_robot_by_avero-d4sg2dv

Prezi: Campaign Bots & The Law

Here is an interactive Prezi on our recent paper “Campaign Bots & The Law”, authored by Ryan Calo, Lisa Manheim, Sam Woolley and Phil Howard.  We identify the ways in which bots, when used by political campaign managers, may make politicians run afoul of election and campaign regulations.

1 2 3 5